PhysicsLAB
AP Program Copyright

The Advanced Placement program now includes a "permission to copy" statement in its publications, which grants more generous copying concessions to AP teachers than those granted by the provisions of Fair Use (see bottom of next page for more information). This is the AP use statement:

AP exam materials are intended for use by AP teachers for course and exam preparation in the classroom; permission for any other use must be sought from the AP Program. Teachers may reproduce them, In whole or in part, in limited quantities, for face-to-face teaching purposes but may not mass distribute tbe materials, electronically or otherwise. AP exam materials and any copies made of them may not be resold, and the copyright notices must be retained as they appear on the original copy. This permission does not apply to any third-party copyrights contained within the materials.

Let's see how this can be interpreted to answer some common questions:

Q2: I teach a distance learning course In AP Chemistry. I post released exam questions and student sample responses and parts of the Course Description on my site to use with the students. Do I have to stop doing that?

A: AP exam materials are intended for use by AP teachers for course and exam preparation in the classroom; permission for any other use must be sought from the AP Program. You might think that this is just a variation on Question 1, and that this teacher will have to pull down all those AP materials. But it isn't, and he or she won't have to. Copying and using these materials in a virtual classroom, at a special study session after regular class hours, or in a classroom with lab tables, chemicals, students and a teacher present is fine if they are part of a participating AP school's curriculum.



Distributed at Summer 2000 AP Reading