PhysicsLAB Worksheet
Energy Methods: More Practice with Projectiles

 
Refer to the following information for the next two questions.

A projectile is thrown straight downwards at 6 m/sec from the top of a 30-meter balcony.
Use energy methods to determine how fast it is moving just as it strikes the ground at the base of the balcony. 

How much time does it spend in the air? 

Refer to the following information for the next four questions.

A projectile is thrown straight upwards at 6 m/sec from the top of a 30-meter balcony.
Use energy methods to determine the maximum height, above the base of the balcony, reached by the projectile in its trajectory. 

Use energy methods to determine how fast the projectile is traveling when it is halfway down; that is, when it is 15 meters above the ground at the base of the balcony? 

Use energy methods to determine how fast it is moving just as it strikes the ground at the base of the balcony. 

How much time does it spend in the air? 

Refer to the following information for the next four questions.

A projectile is thrown horizontally at 6 m/sec off the top of a 30-meter balcony.
Use energy methods to determine how fast the projectile will be traveling just as it strikes the ground. 

Determine the angle that the projectile strikes the ground at the base of the balcony. 

How much time does the projectile take to reach the ground? 

Will the projectile hit a bulls-eye placed 15 meters away from the base of the building? 

Refer to the following information for the next four questions.

A projectile is released at 15 m/sec at an angle of 37º from the top of a 30 meter balcony.
projectile.gif (2945 bytes)
How fast will it be moving as it passes through the apex of its trajectory?
 
How fast will it be traveling when it strikes the ground? 

At what angle will it strike the ground?
 
A second projectile is thrown off the same building at the same speed but at an angle of 53º. Compare the following criteria: their impact speeds, their impact angles, their ranges, their total time spent in the air. 





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