PhysicsLAB NY Regents
June 2015, Part 3

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51.–52. Calculate the minimum power output of an electric motor that lifts a 1.30 × 104-newton elevator car vertically upward at a constant speed of 1.50 meters per second. [Show all work, including the equation and substitution with units.] [2] 

53–54. A microwave oven emits a microwave with a wavelength of 2.00 × 10−2 meter in air. Calculate the frequency of the microwave. [Show all work, including the equation and substitution with units.] [2] 

55–56. Calculate the energy equivalent in joules of the mass of a proton. [Show all work, including the equation and substitution with units.] [2]
 

Refer to the following information for the next two questions.

Base your answers to questions 57 through 59 on the information and diagram below and on your knowledge of physics.
 
A 1.5 × 103-kilogram car is driven at a constant speed of 12 meters per second counterclockwise around a horizontal circular track having a radius of 50. meters, as represented below.
 
57. On the diagram in your answer booklet, draw an arrow to indicate the direction of the velocity of the car when it is at the position shown. Start the arrow on the car. [1]
 

58–59 Calculate the magnitude of the centripetal acceleration of the car. [Show all work, including the equation and substitution with units.] [2] 

Refer to the following information for the next two questions.

Base your answers to questions 60 through 62 on the information below and on your knowledge of physics.
 
A football is thrown at an angle of 30.° above the horizontal. The magnitude of the horizontal component of the ball’s initial velocity is 13.0 meters per second. The magnitude of the vertical component of the ball’s initial velocity is 7.5 meters per second. [Neglect friction.]
 
 
60. On the axes in your answer booklet, draw a graph representing the relationship between the horizontal displacement of the football and the time the football is in the air. [1]
 
 

61–62. The football is caught at the same height from which it is thrown. Calculate the total time the football was in the air. [Show all work, including the equation and substitution with units.] [2] 

Refer to the following information for the next two questions.

Base your answers to questions 63 through 65 on the information and diagram below and on your knowledge of physics.
 
A ray of light ( f = 5.09 × 1014 Hz) traveling through a block of an unknown material, passes at an angle of incidence of 30.° into air, as shown in the diagram below.
 
 
63. Use a protractor to determine the angle of refraction of the light ray as it passes from the unknown material into air. [1] 

64–65. Calculate the index of refraction of the unknown material. [Show all work, including the equation and substitution with units.] [2] 

Refer to the following information for the next four questions.

 
The diagram below represents a 4.0-newton force applied to a 0.200-kilogram copper block sliding to the right on a horizontal steel table.
 
 
66. Determine the weight of the block. [1] 

67–68. Calculate the magnitude of the force of friction acting on the moving block. [Show all work, including the equation and substitution with units.] [2] 

69. Determine the magnitude of the net force acting on the moving block. [1] 

70. Describe what happens to the magnitude of the velocity of the block as the block slides across the table. [1] 

Refer to the following information for the next four questions.

Base your answers to questions 71 through 75 on the information and diagram below and on your knowledge of physics.
 
Two conducting parallel plates 5.0 × 10−3 meter apart are charged with a 12-volt potential difference. An electron is located midway between the plates. The magnitude of the electrostatic force on the electron is 3.8 × 10−16 newton.
 
 
71. On the diagram in your answer booklet, draw at least three field lines to represent the direction of the electric field in the space between the charged plates. [1] 

72. Identify the direction of the electrostatic force that the electric field exerts on the electron. [1] 

73–74. Calculate the magnitude of the electric field strength between the plates, in newtons per coulomb. [Show all work, including the equation and substitution with units.] [2] 

75. Describe what happens to the magnitude of the net electrostatic force on the electron as the electron is moved toward the positive plate. [1] 

Refer to the following information for the next four questions.

Base your answers to questions 76 through 80 on the information below and on your knowledge of physics.
 
An electron in a mercury atom changes from energy level b to a higher energy level when the atom absorbs a single photon with an energy of 3.06 electronvolts.
 
76. Determine the letter that identifies the energy level to which the electron jumped when the mercury atom absorbed the photon. [1] 

77. Determine the energy of the photon, in joules. [1] 

78–79. Calculate the frequency of the photon. [Show all work, including the equation and substitution with units.] [2] 

80. Classify the photon as one of the types of electromagnetic radiation listed in the electromagnetic spectrum. [1] 

Refer to the following information for the next four questions.

Base your answers to questions 81 through 85 on the information and circuit diagram below and on your knowledge of physics.
 
Three lamps are connected in parallel to a 120.-volt source of potential difference, as represented below.
 
 
81–82. Calculate the resistance of the 40.-watt lamp. [Show all work, including the equation and substitution with units.] [2] 

83. Describe what change, if any, would occur in the power dissipated by the 100.-watt lamp if the 60.-watt lamp were to burn out.[1]
 

84. Describe what change, if any, would occur in the equivalent resistance of the circuit if the 60.-watt lamp were to burn out. [1]
 

85. The circuit is disassembled. The same three lamps are then connected in series with each other and the source. Compare the equivalent resistance of this series circuit to the equivalent resistance of the parallel circuit. [1]
 





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