PhysicsLAB NY Regents
June 2012, Part 3

Refer to the following information for the next two questions.

Some questions may require the use of the 2006 Edition Reference Tables for Physical Setting/Physics.
 
Base your answers to questions 51 through 53 on the information below. A student produced various elongations of a spring by applying a series of forces to the spring. The graph below represents the relationship between the applied force and the elongation of the spring.
 
 
51. Determine the spring constant of the spring. [1] 

52–53. Calculate the energy stored in the spring when the elongation is 0.30 meter. [Show all work, including the equation and substitution with units.] [2] 


54–55. Calculate the time required for a 6000.-newton net force to stop a 1200.-kilogram car initially traveling at 10. meters per second. [Show all work, including the equation and substitution with units.] [2] 

56–57. A toy rocket is launched twice into the air from level ground and returns to level ground. The rocket is first launched with initial speed v at an angle of 45° above the horizontal. It is launched the second time with the same initial speed, but with the launch angle increased to 60.° above the horizontal. Describe how both the total horizontal distance the rocket travels and the time in the air are affected by the increase in launch angle. [Neglect friction.] [2] 

58–59 Calculate the magnitude of the average gravitational force between Earth and the Moon. [Show  all work, including the equation and substitution with units.]  [2] 

Refer to the following information for the next two questions.

Base your answers to questions 60 through 63 on the information below.
 
A 15-ohm resistor and a 20.-ohm resistor are connected in parallel with a 9.0-volt battery. A single ammeter is connected to measure the total current of the circuit.
 
60–61. In the space in your answer booklet, draw a diagram of this circuit using symbols from the Reference Tables for Physical Setting/Physics. [Assume the availability of any number of wires of negligible resistance.]   [2] 

62–63. Calculate the equivalent resistance of the circuit. [Show all work, including the equation and substitution with units.]  [2]
 

Refer to the following information for the next two questions.

Base your answers to questions 64 and 65 on the diagram below, which shows a wave in a rope.
 
64. Determine the wavelength of the wave.  [1] 

65. Determine the amplitude of the wave.  [1] 

Refer to the following information for the next four questions.

A runner accelerates uniformly from rest to a speed of 8.00 meters per second. The kinetic energy of the runner was determined at 2.00-meter-per-second intervals and recorded in the data table below.
 
 
Using the information in the data table, construct a graph on the grid in your answer booklet following the directions below.
66. Plot the data points for kinetic energy of the runner versus his speed.  [1]
 
 

67. Draw the line or  curve of best fit.  [1] 

68–69. Calculate the mass of the runner. [Show all work, including the equation and substitution with units.]   [2] 

70. A soccer player having less mass than the runner also accelerates uniformly from rest to a speed  of 8.00 meters per second. Compare the kinetic energy of the less massive soccer player to the kinetic energy of the more massive runner when both are traveling at the same speed.   [1] 

Refer to the following information for the next three questions.

Base your answers to questions 71 through 75 on the information below.
 
 
A river has a current flowing with a velocity of 2.0 meters per second due east. A boat is 75 meters from the north riverbank. It travels at 3.0 meters per second relative to the river and is headed due north. In the diagram below, the vector starting at point P represents the velocity of the boat relative to the river water.
71–72. Calculate the time required for the boat to cross the river. [Show all work, including the equation and substitution with units.]  [2] 

73. On  the  diagram,  use  a  ruler  and  protractor  to  construct  a  vector representing the velocity of the river current. Begin the vector at point P and use a scale of 1.0 centimeter = 0.50 meter per second.   [1] 

74–75. Calculate or find graphically the magnitude of the resultant velocity of the boat. [Show all work, including the equation and substitution with units or construct the resultant velocity vector in your answer booklet for question 73, using a scale of 1.0 centimeter = 0.50 meter per second. [2] 

Refer to the following information for the next four questions.

Base your answers to questions 76 through 80 on the information below.
A light ray (f = 5.09 x 1014 Hz) is refracted as it travels from water into flint glass. The path of the light ray in the flint glass is shown in the diagram below.
 
76. Using a protractor, measure the angle of refraction of the light ray in the flint glass.  [1] 

77–78. Calculate the angle of incidence for the light ray in water. [Show all work, including the equation and substitution with units.]   [2] 

79. Using a protractor and straightedge, on the diagram in your answer booklet, draw the path of the incident light ray in the water.  [1] 

80. Identify one physical event, other than transmission or refraction, that occurs as the light interacts with the water-flint glass boundary.   [1] 

Refer to the following information for the next four questions.

Base your answers to questions 81 through 85 on the information below.
 
Two experiments running simultaneously at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory in Batavia, Ill., have observed a new particle called the cascade baryon. It is one of the most massive examples yet of a baryon—a class of particles made of three quarks held together by the strong nuclear force—and the first to contain one quark from each of the three known families, or generations, of these elementary particles. Protons and neutrons are made of up and down quarks, the two first-generation quarks. Strange and charm quarks constitute the second generation, while the top and bottom varieties make up the third. Physicists had long conjectured that a down quark could combine with a strange and a bottom quark to form the three-generation cascade baryon.On June 13, the scientists running Dzero, one of two detectors at Fermilab’s Tevatron accelerator, announced that they had detected characteristic showers of particles from the decay of cascade baryons. The baryons formed in proton-antiproton collisions and lived no more than a trillionth of a second. A week later, physicists at CDF, the Tevatron’s other detector, reported their own sighting of the baryon…
 
 
Source: D.C., “Pas de deux for a three-scoop particle,” Science News, Vol. 172, July 7, 2007
81. Which combination of three quarks will produce a neutron?   [1] 

82. What is the magnitude and sign of the charge, in elementary charges, of a cascade baryon?  [1] 

83. The Tevatron derives its name from teraelectronvolt, the maximum energy it can impart to a particle. Determine the energy, in joules, equivalent to 1.00 teraelectronvolt.   [1] 

84–85. Calculate the maximum total mass, in kilograms, of particles that could be created in the head-on collision of a proton and an antiproton, each having an energy of 1.60 x 10-7 joule. [Show all work, including the equation and substitution with units.]   [2] 





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