PhysicsLAB CP Workbook
Archimedes Principle #2

Refer to the following information for the next three questions.
The water lines for the first three cases are shown. Discuss with your partner and then describe where the appropriate water lines should be drawn for cases d and e, and then make up your own situation for case f.




(a) denser than water (b) same density as water (c) 1/2 as dense as water (f) ?
 
(d) 1/4th as dense as water
(e) 3/4th as dense as water
(f)  ?  as dense as water
 
 
Refer to the following information for the next three questions.

The first two sketches below show the water line for an empty and a loaded ship. Discuss with your partner and then describe where the appropriate water line should be drawn for the third sketch.
 
Ship empty Ship loaded with
50 tons of iron
Ship loaded with
50 tons of styrofoam
 
The third water line should be ____ 

If a floating ship weighs 100 million N, then the water it displaces weighs ____. 

If cargo weighing 1000 N is put on board then the ship will sink down until an extra ____ of water is displaced. 

Refer to the following information for the next question.

Here is a glass of ice water with an ice cube floating in it. Discuss with your partner where the water line should be drawn after the ice cube melts.
 
Will the water line
 
Refer to the following information for the next five questions.

The air-filled balloon is weighted so it sinks in water. Near the surface, the balloon has a certain volume. Discuss with your partner how you should draw the balloon at the bottom (inside the dashed square).
State whether it is
 
Since the weighted balloon sinks, how does its overall density compare to the density of water? 

As the weighted balloon sinks, does its density
 
Since the weighted balloon sinks, how does the buoyant force on it compare to its weight? 

As the weighted balloon sinks deeper, does the buoyant force on it
 
Refer to the following information for the next four questions.

What if a rock instead of an air-filled balloon were weighted so that it sinks in water.
Since the weighted rock sinks, how does its overall density compare to the density of water? 

As the weighted rock sinks, does its density
 
Since the weighted rock sinks, how does the buoyant force on it compare to its weight? 

As the weighted rock sinks deeper, does the buoyant force on it
 




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