PhysicsLAB Worksheet
Vertical Circular Motion #1

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Refer to the following information for the next eight questions.

 
Why is an object moving in vertical circular motion not considered to be in uniform circular motion?
 

Can the 5 kinematics equations for uniformly accelerated motion be used to solve for unknowns when working with objects moving in vertical circular motion?
 
Is mechanical energy conserved when an object is moving in vertical circular motion?
 
At what position in an object's vertical circular path is the magnitude of its velocity greatest?
 
At what position in an object's vertical circular path does it experience the greatest centripetal force?
 
At what position in an object's vertical circular path does it experience the least amount of centripetal force?
 
Which of the following formulas correctly expresses the tension in the string as the object passes through the bottom of a vertical circle?
 
Which of the following formulas correctly expresses the tension in the string as the object passes through the top of a vertical circle?
 
Refer to the following information for the next four questions.

Modern roller coasters allow their riders to experience a myriad of "normal" situations.
 
image courtesy of the Top Ten Roller Coaster in North America
The Incredible Hulk at Islands of Adventure in Orland, FL
                                 
If the roller coaster car is moving (upside down) through the inside of a loop, the normal force experienced by the participants is
 
If the roller coaster car is traveling across the top of a hill (right side up), the normal experienced by the participants is
 
What formula would be used to calculate the critical velocity for the participants to feel "apparently weightless" in the previous question?
 
If the roller coaster is traveling (right side up) through a dip between hills, the normal force experienced by the participants is
 
Refer to the following information for the next six questions.

In this section you will calculate the normal force at points A, B, and C for a 50-gram hot-wheels car released from rest at point D. The red-triangular marker, along the vertical meter stick on the left, has been placed at height of the loop's diameter. We are going to assume that the car "slides" along the track …. that is, that we do not need to worry about any rotational energy of its wheels.
 

image courtesy of MIT Technical Services
 
Let the height at position D be 75 cm, the height of position A be 0 cm, the height of position B = 25 cm, and the height of position C be 50 cm.
 
 
Using conservation of energy, how fast will the car be traveling when it reaches point A? 

What normal force will be exerted by the track on the car at A? 

Using conservation of energy, how fast will the car be traveling when it reaches point B? 

What normal force will be exerted by the track on the car at B? 

Using conservation of energy, how fast will the car be traveling when it reaches point C? 

What normal force will be exerted by the track on the car at C? 




 
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